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Aaron, age 41

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As an Alternative Teacher, Aaron assists students who historically have struggled with academics, behavior, and attendance. He loves helping students who have a negative outlook on school and life. He feels he can bring a small dose of optimism into their lives and hopefully get them started on the right path to success. His biggest challenge is that sometimes it is difficult to deal with the constant setbacks, but he celebrates the small victories with his students.

We asked Aaron some questions about what he knows or wants to know about the 403(b) and saving for retirement, and this is what he said.

On a scale of 1 to 10, with 10 being total understanding, how well do you understand saving for retirement? Why did you pick this number?

I picked 9 because I have been investing for years and have read up on low-cost investing and staying the course. I found 403bwise a number of years ago and have utilized the message board to get my questions answered.

What is your biggest money worry?

I worry about a market collapse and another Great Depression.

Do you have a 403(b)? If yes, are you satisfied with your investment? If you do not have a 403(b), why not?

No, because I really don’t like the options my county provides me. I used to have access to Fidelity at my old school.

Did you ever hear about the 403(b) in your teacher preparation program?

No. Not once.

Do you know what a fiduciary financial advisor is? If yes, how would you describe a fiduciary to a colleague?

Yes. An advisor who has the customer’s best interest as a priority.

If you could ask a financial advisor one question what would it be?

How will you assist me in reaching my goals and how do you get paid? Fees?

Anything else you would like to share with us?

I love investing and started when I was 21. I am well on my way to a solid retirement and will be working until I am 63.

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